What are the Different Street Types? | Real Estate Definition

By October 16, 2011TERM
What Are Street Types? - Real Estate Term

What are Street Types?

Street types (also known as street suffixes) are identifiers of street names and serve to describe the street. Some examples of street types are: street, road, avenue, boulevard, junction, crescent, etc.

Real Estate Agent Explains Street Types

My city (Edmonton) is a city based on a grid for the most part. Streets run north to south and avenues run east to west. We know when we see these suffixes, that these roads are running a certain way. This makes it easy to find addresses because they are just mostly simple coordinates. However, there are some exceptions – and when you’ve gotten used to the grid, you can have problems finding houses if there is no grid system in place. Roads that aren’t on the grid are not called streets or avenues, because those types are reserved for straight roadways.  So we have many other ways to describe a ‘street’ or road and each of those has an abbreviation.

Often when you see real estate listings these abbreviations have no explanation and in certain neighbourhoods that can be confusing. There are two ways to abbreviate a street type in Edmonton; you could do it according to the authority on Canadian mailing addresses (Canada Post) – which uses up to 6 characters, or use the shorter codes like the Edmonton real estate agents do. My thinking is that these short, two letter abbreviations are probably left over from the old MLS® system that had limited character space, but they are still used today, even though MLS® now has a lot more space for a listing’s address entry.

Here is a chart laying out the different abbreviations you can have for different kinds of street types:

Street Type or Suffix Abbreviation (Canada Post) Abbreviation (US Postal Service) Abbreviation (Edmonton Real Estate Standard)
Abbey ABBEY
Acres ACRES AC
Alley or Allée ALLEY or ALLÉE ALY AL
Annex or Anex ANX
Arcade ARC
Autoroute AUT
Avenue AVE or AV AVE AV
Bay BAY BA
Bayou BYU
Beach BEACH BCH BE
Bend BEND BND BN
Bluff or Bluffs BLF or BLFS
Box
Bottom BTM
Boulevard BLVD or BOUL BLVD BV
Branch BR
Bridge BRG
Brook or Brooks BRK or BRKS
Burg or Burgs BG or BGS
Burrow
By-pass or Bypass BYPASS BYP
Byway BYWAY
Camp CP
Campus CAMPUS
Canyon CYN
Cape CAPE CPE CA
Carré CAR
Carrefour CARREF
Castle CS
Causeway CSWY
Centre or Centres CTR or C CTR or CTRS CE
Cercle CERCLE
Chare CHARE (North-east England)
Chase CHASE
Chemin CH
Circle or Circles CIR CIR or CIRS CI
Circuit CIRCT
Cliffs or Cliff CLF or CLFS
Close CLOSE CL
Club CLB
Common or Commons COMMON CMN or CMNS CM
Concession CONC
Corners or Corner CRNRS COR or CORS
Côte CÔTE
Cour COUR
Cours COURS
Course CRSE
Court or Courts CRT CT or CTS CO
Cove or Coves COVE CV or CVS CV
Creek CRK
Crescent CRES CRES CR
Crest CRST CT
Croissant CROIS
Cross CX
Crossing CROSS XING XS
Crossroads or Crossroad XRD or XRDS
Cul-de-sac CDS
Curve CURV
Dale DALE DL
Dam DM
Dell DELL
Diagonal
Diversion DIVERS DI
Divide DV
Downs DOWNS DO
Drive DR DR DR
Échangeur ÉCH
End END EN
Esplanade ESPL
Estates or Estate ESTATE ESTS or EST ES
Expressway EXPY EXPY
Extension or Extensions EXTEN EXT or EXTS
Fall FALL
Falls FLS
Farm FARM
Ferry FRY
Field or Fields FIELD FLD or FLDS
Flat or Flats FLT of FLTS
Ford or Fords FRD or FRDS
Forest FOREST FRST
Forge or Forges FRG or FRGS
Fork or Forks FRK or FRKS
Fort FT
Freeway FWY FWY FR
Front FRONT
Gardens or Garden GDNS GDNS or GDN GD
Gate GATE GA or GT
Gateway GTWY GW
Glade GLADE
Glen or Glens GLEN GLN or GLNS GL
Glenway
Golfway
Green or Greens GREEN or GREENS GRN or GRNS GR
Grounds GRNDS
Grove or Groves GROVE GRV or GRVS GV
Hall HL
Harbour or Harbours HARBR HBR or HBRS HB
Haven HVN HA
Heath HEATH HE
Heights HTS HTS HT
Highlands HGHLDS
Highway HWY HWY HI
Hill or Hills HILL HL or HLS HL
Hollow HOLLOW HOLW HO
Île ÎLE
Impasse IMP
Inlet INLET INLT IN
Island or Islands ISLAND IS or ISS IS
Isle ISLE
Junction or Junctions JCT or JCTS
Keep KE
Key or Keys KEY KY or KYS KY
Knoll or Knolls KNOLL KNL or KNLS KN
Lake or Lakes LK or LKS LK
Land LAND
Landing LANDNG LNDG LD
Lane LANE LN LN
Light or Lights LGT or LGTS
Limits LMTS
Line LINE
Ligne
Link LINK LI
Loaf LF
Lock or Locks LCK or LCKS
Lodge LDG
Lookout LKOUT
Loop LOOP LOOP LO
Mall MALL MALL MA
Manor or Manors MANOR MNR or MNRS MR
Maze MAZE MZ
Meadow or Meadows MEADOW MDW or MDWS MD
Mews MEWS MEWS ME
Mill or Mills ML or MLS
Mission MSN
Montée MONTÉE
Moor MOOR
Motorway MTWY
Mount MOUNT MT MT
Mountain or Mountains MTN MTN or MTNS
Neck NCK
Nene NENE (Tallahasse Florida)
Not Applicable NA
Oaks OA
Orchard ORCH ORCH
Oval OVAL
Overpass OPAS
Parade PARADE PR
Park or Parc PK or PARC PARK PA
Parkway PKY PKWY PK
Pass or Passage PASS PASS or PSGE PS
Path PATH PATH PH
Pathway PTWAY
Peak
Pike PIKE
Pine or Pines PINES PINE or PNES
Place PL or PLACE PL PL
Placeway
Plain or Plains PLN or PLNS
Plateau PLAT
Plaza PLAZA PLZ PZ
Point or Pointe PT or POINTE PT PT
Pond PD
Port PORT PRT
Prairie PR
Private PVT
Promenade PROM PM
Quai QUAI
Quary QU
Quay QUAY QY
Radial RADL
Ramp RAMP RAMP
Ranch RNCH RA
Rang RANG
Range RG
Rangée
Rapid or Rapids RPD or RPDS
Reach
Rest RST
Ridge or Ridges RIDGE RDG or RDGS RG
Right of Way ROWY (usually seen in Australia)
Rise RISE RI
River RIV
Road RD RD RD
Rond-point RDPT
Ronde
Round
Route RTE RTE
Row ROW ROW RO
Rue RUE RUE
Ruelle RLE
Run RUN RUN RU
Sentier SENT
Shoal or Shoals SHL or SHLS
Shores or Shore SHR or SHRS SH
Sideroad
Skyway SKWY
Springs or Spring SPG or SPGS SP
Spur SPUR
Square or Squares SQ or SQS SQ or SQS SQ
Station STA or STN STA
Standard
Stravenue STRA
Stream STRM
Street ST ST ST
Streets STS
Stroll
Subdivision SUBDIV
Summit or Summits SMT SU
Terrace or Terrasse TERR or TSSE TER TC
Thicket THICK
Throughway TRWY
Tour
Towers TOWERS
Townline TLINE
Trace TRCE
Track TRAK
Trafficway TRFY
Trail TRAIL TRL TR
Tailer TRLR
Tunnel TUNL
Turnabout TRNABT
Turnpike TPKE
Two TW
Underpass UPAS
Union or Unions UN UNS
Vale VALE VA
Valley or Valleys VLY VLYS
Via or Viaduct VIA VIA
View or Views VIEW VW or VWS VW
Village or Villages VILLGE VG
Villa or Villas VILLA or VILLAS VLG or VLGS VI
Ville VL
Vista VISTA VIS
Voie VOIE VS
Walk or Walkway WALK WALK WK
Wall WALL
Way or Ways WAY WAY or WAYS WY
Well WL
Wells WLS
Wharf WHARF
Wold
Wood or Woods WOOD or WOODS WO
Wynd WYND WD

Why Does It Matter?

The original reason for different kinds of streets or designations is to describe a street. It’s helpful to know a certain street is a crescent, because then we know it’s going to have a curve. If it’s a maze, then we know it will be a total zig-zag, if it’s a wynd, it probably curves this way and that. If you live on an avenue in Edmonton, it’s going to be a straight roadway that runs east to west. If you live on a stroll, it’s likely a narrow pathway – perhaps one that doesn’t even allow cars and if you live on a close, it’s likely a road with no outlet – perhaps a cul-de-sac. These designations serve to help you picture a roadway before you even get there. Also, developers certainly choose a street type to advertise an area. For example, if you see the name Elk Meadows, you probably are thinking this location will be in a park-like setting. It might just be a townhouse complex in the middle of the city, but the name serves to give the area a natural, outdoorsy feeling. This can help sell someone on the location when they are looking for a property to buy.

To illustrate how important these street types can be, let’s look at Wedgewood Heights in Edmonton. In one corner of Wedgewood Heights, there are four different streets with the same name (and different street types). They are: Weber Way, Weber Place, Weber Close and Weber Gate. You can see how it could get a little confusing if you didn’t have the street type and the street name was the same for two nearby roads. This isn’t really a big deal if they’re close together because you can just drive to the next road which is sometimes connected, but if they’re separated at all, you could end up looking on the wrong street completely.

In another corner, there are three different streets with the same name and different types: Welbourn Cove, Welbourn Lane and Welbourn Drive. Again, it’s a confusing situation when searching for a house.

A map showing an area with three different street types with the same name.

A map showing an area with three different street types with the same name.

Other issues include mistakes with the abbreviations themselves. In Edmonton, some common street types that get mixed up are Court (CO) and Crest (CT), and also Villa (VI) and Village (VG) can have the wrong abbreviations associated with their real estate listing address.


 

by +Alan F Macdonald REALTOR® | Copyright © – gimme-shelter.com

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Author Alan F Macdonald

Alan F Macdonald is a real estate agent with Realty Executives Challenge in Edmonton, Alberta.

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